Paul Ayris

Paul Ayris

University College London

    Dr Ayris is Pro-Vice-Provost (UCL Library Services & UCL Office for Open Science and Scholarship). He joined UCL in 1997.
    Dr Ayris was the President of LIBER (Association of European Research Libraries) 2010-14. He was Chair of the LERU (League of European Research Universities) INFO Community for 10 years, ending in 2020. He also chairs OAI12 – The Geneva Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication. He is a member of the UUK High-Level Strategy Group on E-Resource purchasing for the Jisc community. On 1 August 2013, Dr Ayris became Chief Executive of UCL Press. He has served two terms of office as a member of the President’s and Provost’s Senior Management Team in UCL. On 1 October 2020, Dr Ayris launched the UCL Office for Open Science and Scholarship, of which he is head.
    He has a Ph.D. in Ecclesiastical History and publishes on English Reformation Studies. In 2019, he was made a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

    Chapter XXXIX of Focus on Open Science: Budapest

    Presentation: UCL Press: A Model for the Future of Open Access Scholarly Publishing
    This presentation looks at how UCL manages the move to Open Science in UCL via the newly-formed UCL Office for Open Science. UCL Press is the UK’s first fully Open Access University Press and has 3 publishing platforms: research monographs, journals and Open Access textbooks. The paper will place scholarly publishing in the context of UCL’s portfolio of activities in the Open Science landscape. Looking particularly at UCL Press, the paper will examine the success of its research monograph programme, analyze the new model for open journals which the Press has established, and describe how the covid-19 pandemic accelerated the Press’s move to produce Open Access textbooks.

    All Sessions by Paul Ayris

    Chapter I: Vienna 20/11/2017
    10:10 - 10:50

    The Empires of the Future are The Empires of the Mind: Defining the Role of Libraries in Open Science Landscape

    Open Science represents a potential revolution in the way that research is undertaken, disseminated and curated. The paper will look at the main elements of the Open Science workflow – conceptualization, data gathering, analysis, publication, review – and the characteristics of that workflow – citizen science, open code, open access, preprints, alternative reputation systems, science blogs, open annotation, open data, open lab books/workflows, data-intensive approaches. Having established the baseline for Open Science approaches, the paper will look at the impact of open science in 4 areas of activity, identify the current role of the Library in each and the potential the Library has to contribute to this agenda going forward. The four areas which the paper will address are open access and new publishing models, research data management, the European Open Science cloud and citizen science. In the area of open access, libraries have customarily engaged in the payment of APCs (article processing charges) and in establishing open access repositories. The paper will look at activity in one of the most active UK open access teams at UCL and then examine future publishing models. In particular, it will show universities might themselves subvert the current monograph model by offering publishing services from university libraries. In research data management, the outputs and outcomes of the EU-funded LEARN project will be analysed. These will dwell on research data management policy, best practice case studies, executive briefings and the findings of a survey looking at the level of preparation for RDM in research organisations across the globe. The paper will look particularly at the future role for libraries in the research data space, which the LEARN project is identifying, and suggest that research data management in the context of open science re-defines the role of the Library in research support and the research workflow. The European open science cloud (EOSC) has the potential to put Europe at the forefront of open science developments. As a member of the high-level EOSC Expert Group, the principal speaker will analyse the main drivers behind the recommendations for the development of the cloud and the future role for libraries in sustaining this revolutionary development. Citizen science is part of citizen engagement in science and research. We observe a growing interest of citizens to contribute to a better society. In conjunction with newly-available technologies, a world of opportunities opens for research institutions. The paper will map existing experiences and recommendations from research intensive organizations and we will then present a blueprint for the roles of the library in this landscape with Guidelines for best practice. The paper will conclude by analysing the challenges which open science presents. Rooted in the research workflow, the paper will identify the impact which open science is having on libraries and identify future roles that they can adopt in their institutions, both to support and also to help lead open science implementation.

    14:10 - 14:30

    The H2020 Project LEARN: Sustainable Outreach and Long Term Impact on Communities

    Chapter II: Budapest 22/11/2017
    10:10 - 10:50

    The Empires of the Future are The Empires of the Mind: Defining the Role of Libraries in Open Science Landscape

    Open Science represents a potential revolution in the way that research is undertaken, disseminated and curated. The paper will look at the main elements of the Open Science workflow – conceptualization, data gathering, analysis, publication, review – and the characteristics of that workflow – citizen science, open code, open access, preprints, alternative reputation systems, science blogs, open annotation, open data, open lab books/workflows, data-intensive approaches. Having established the baseline for Open Science approaches, the paper will look at the impact of open science in 4 areas of activity, identify the current role of the Library in each and the potential the Library has to contribute to this agenda going forward. The four areas which the paper will address are open access and new publishing models, research data management, the European Open Science cloud and citizen science. In the area of open access, libraries have customarily engaged in the payment of APCs (article processing charges) and in establishing open access repositories. The paper will look at activity in one of the most active UK open access teams at UCL and then examine future publishing models. In particular, it will show universities might themselves subvert the current monograph model by offering publishing services from university libraries. In research data management, the outputs and outcomes of the EU-funded LEARN project will be analysed. These will dwell on research data management policy, best practice case studies, executive briefings and the findings of a survey looking at the level of preparation for RDM in research organisations across the globe. The paper will look particularly at the future role for libraries in the research data space, which the LEARN project is identifying, and suggest that research data management in the context of open science re-defines the role of the Library in research support and the research workflow. The European open science cloud (EOSC) has the potential to put Europe at the forefront of open science developments. As a member of the high-level EOSC Expert Group, the principal speaker will analyse the main drivers behind the recommendations for the development of the cloud and the future role for libraries in sustaining this revolutionary development. Citizen science is part of citizen engagement in science and research. We observe a growing interest of citizens to contribute to a better society. In conjunction with newly-available technologies, a world of opportunities opens for research institutions. The paper will map existing experiences and recommendations from research intensive organizations and we will then present a blueprint for the roles of the library in this landscape with Guidelines for best practice. The paper will conclude by analysing the challenges which open science presents. Rooted in the research workflow, the paper will identify the impact which open science is having on libraries and identify future roles that they can adopt in their institutions, both to support and also to help lead open science implementation.

    11:10 - 12:10

    Panel Discussion

    Moderator: Diane Geraci, Director, CEU Library

    Chapter III: Ljubljana 24/11/2017
    09:10 - 09:50

    The Empires of the Future are The Empires of the Mind: Defining the Role of Libraries in Open Science Landscape

    Open Science represents a potential revolution in the way that research is undertaken, disseminated and curated. The paper will look at the main elements of the Open Science workflow – conceptualization, data gathering, analysis, publication, review – and the characteristics of that workflow – citizen science, open code, open access, preprints, alternative reputation systems, science blogs, open annotation, open data, open lab books/workflows, data-intensive approaches. Having established the baseline for Open Science approaches, the paper will look at the impact of open science in 4 areas of activity, identify the current role of the Library in each and the potential the Library has to contribute to this agenda going forward. The four areas which the paper will address are open access and new publishing models, research data management, the European Open Science cloud and citizen science. In the area of open access, libraries have customarily engaged in the payment of APCs (article processing charges) and in establishing open access repositories. The paper will look at activity in one of the most active UK open access teams at UCL and then examine future publishing models. In particular, it will show universities might themselves subvert the current monograph model by offering publishing services from university libraries. In research data management, the outputs and outcomes of the EU-funded LEARN project will be analysed. These will dwell on research data management policy, best practice case studies, executive briefings and the findings of a survey looking at the level of preparation for RDM in research organisations across the globe. The paper will look particularly at the future role for libraries in the research data space, which the LEARN project is identifying, and suggest that research data management in the context of open science re-defines the role of the Library in research support and the research workflow. The European open science cloud (EOSC) has the potential to put Europe at the forefront of open science developments. As a member of the high-level EOSC Expert Group, the principal speaker will analyse the main drivers behind the recommendations for the development of the cloud and the future role for libraries in sustaining this revolutionary development. Citizen science is part of citizen engagement in science and research. We observe a growing interest of citizens to contribute to a better society. In conjunction with newly-available technologies, a world of opportunities opens for research institutions. The paper will map existing experiences and recommendations from research intensive organizations and we will then present a blueprint for the roles of the library in this landscape with Guidelines for best practice. The paper will conclude by analysing the challenges which open science presents. Rooted in the research workflow, the paper will identify the impact which open science is having on libraries and identify future roles that they can adopt in their institutions, both to support and also to help lead open science implementation.

    Chapter IV: Rome 17/5/2018
    09:20 - 09:55

    ‘Be the change that you wish to see in the world (Mahatma Ghandi)’: Universities and Cultural Change to deliver Open Science

    This paper will be built on the LERU (League of European Research Universities) Advice Paper on Open Science, which was presented to the Competitiveness Council of the European Union in May 2018. The Council works in four major policy areas, including research and innovation, to enhance competitiveness and increase growth. The paper begins by identifying cultural change as the key element in delivering substantial and sustainable change in universities. Looking at the challenges and benefits of Open Science, the paper then describes a path for how to embed cultural change in academic institutions. The second part of the paper then looks at the eight pillars of Open Science as defined by the Commission and gives examples both of how substantial change has been achieved at a university level, and what the impact of those changes has been. The paper concludes by suggesting a model for how universities can assess whether a cultural change has taken hold to deliver substantial change.

    Chapter V: Barcelona 20/6/2018
    10:05 - 10:40

    ‘Measure for Measure’: Moving to a Responsible Use of Metrics in the Age of Open Science

    This paper looks at the eight pillars of Open Science as defined by the European Commission. It then targets one particular pillar – Altmetrics, or the Responsible Use of Metrics, using insights from the LERU (League of European Research Universities) Advice Paper on Open Science, which was presented to the Competitiveness Council of the European Union in May 2018. Having set the Responsible Use of Metrics in an Open Science Framework, the paper will analyse the findings of a survey on the use of bibliometrics carried out by HEFCE (Higher Education Funding Council for England) in 2017. The resulting analysis creates a baseline against which future activity can be judged. The paper then discusses one of the key LERU recommendations for the Responsible Use of Metrics, that every university should have a Bibliometrics Policy which takes into account the insights of Open Science. The presentation will use UCL (University College London) as an exemplar of a research-led university which has done this, identifying the benefits and challenges which a new approach to bibliometrics brings. The paper ends by suggesting a route that other universities can follow to deliver this form of change at an institutional level.

    Chapter VI: Ljubljana 11/9/2018
    09:15 - 09:50

    Open Science and academic libraries: managing the change

    This presentation looks at the 8 pillars of Open Science as defined by the European Commission. LERU (League of European Research Universities) has issued a Roadmap, which makes 41 Recommendations for European universities on how they might embrace Open Science principles, policies and practices. This paper will look at the 8 pillars of Open Science and some of the Recommendations LERU makes for libraries to support the Open Science movement, concentrating on Open Access publishing, Research Data Management and the responsible use of metrics in research evaluation. Fundamental to the introduction of Open Science is the cultural change necessary to enable universities to embrace such significant change. Open Science has the power to change the way scholarship and discovery are performed and practised in Europe; libraries have a key role to play in effecting this change.

    Chapter VII: Gdansk 25/9/2018
    12:05 - 12:40

    Changing the culture of Research Metrics in research organisations

    The paper will look at the cultural change at an institutional level that is required to effect the move to Open Science. It will describe the 8 pillars of Open Science, as defined by the European Commission, and then look in detail at the issue of the responsible use of metrics. It will analyse the high level findings of a recent HEFCE survey on the use of Bibliometrics in UK universities; and then propose a 4-step plan to enable universities and research organisations to promote the responsible use of metrics. The insights are built around the LERU Roadmap for Open Science, which was published in May 2018.

    Chapter VIII: Belgrade 12/11/2018
    10:10 - 10:45

    ‘Be the change that you wish to see in the world (Mahatma Ghandi)’: Universities and Cultural Change to deliver Open Science

    This presentation will be built on the LERU (League of European Research Universities) Advice Paper on Open Science, which was presented to the Competitiveness Council of the European Union in May 2018. The Council works in four major policy areas, including research and innovation, to enhance competitiveness and increase growth. The paper begins by identifying cultural change as the key element in delivering substantial and sustainable change in universities. Looking at the challenges and benefits of Open Science, the paper then describes a path for how to embed cultural change in academic institutions. The second part of the paper then looks at the eight pillars of Open Science as defined by the Commission and gives examples both of how substantial change has been achieved at the university level, and what the impact of those changes has been. The paper concludes by suggesting a model for how universities can assess whether a cultural change has taken hold to deliver substantial change.

    Chapter IX: Budapest 15/11/2018
    12:05 - 12:40

    From Open Access to Open Scholarship: UCL Press as a model for the Future of Scholarly Publishing

    UCL Press is the UK’s first fully Open Access University Press, founded in June 2015. The presentation will look at Open Science as defined by the European Commission, which has identified the future of scholarly publishing as one of the 8 pillars of the emerging Open Science agenda. This talk will look at the implications of new publishing models for the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences by describing the foundation and activity of UCL Press. UCL Press publishes research monographs, textbooks and journals, and is developing a new platform for journal publishing which will be piloted from the autumn of 2018 in a subject domain in the Social Sciences. The presentation will look at the impact the Press has made – both in terms of the impact of UCL Press titles and the global engagement with the University that has resulted from Press activity. The talk will suggest that every research intensive university would benefit from establishing an Open Access Press, a move which would bring publishing back into the academy, embracing the values of Open Scholarship in the process.

    Chapter X: Vienna 16/11/2018
    09:10 - 09:45

    Be the change that you wish to see in the world (Mahatma Ghandi)’: Universities and Cultural Change to deliver Open Science

    This paper will be built on the LERU (League of European Research Universities) Advice Paper on Open Science, which was presented to the Competitiveness Council of the European Union in May 2018. The Council works in four major policy areas, including research and innovation, to enhance competitiveness and increase growth. The paper begins by identifying cultural change as the key element in delivering substantial and sustainable change in universities. Looking at the challenges and benefits of Open Science, the paper then describes a path for how to embed cultural change in academic institutions. The second part of the paper then looks at the eight pillars of Open Science as defined by the Commission and gives examples both of how substantial change has been achieved at the university level, and what the impact of those changes has been. The paper concludes by suggesting a model for how universities can assess whether a cultural change has taken hold to deliver substantial change.

    Chapter XI: Dublin 29/11/2018
    09:40 - 10:15

    Open Science – Current policies, practices and open issues in Europe

    The LERU Roadmap for Open Science presents a model for how universities and research institutes can engage with the principles of Open Science. The paper will give an overview of the 8 pillars of Open Science which the Roadmap addresses, based on the definition of Open Science offered by the European Commission’s Open Science Policy Platform. The speaker will then concentrate on three of the eight pillars, describing current work in each of these areas in UCL (University College London). For the Future of Scholarly Publishing, the speaker will look at the possible impact of Plan S on current models for scholarly publishing and also describe the new open journal publishing platform being launched by UCL Press in January 2019. The paper will also look at the readiness of universities to participate in the EOSC (European Open Science Cloud), being launched in Vienna on 23 November 2018. The third area the paper will look at is the challenging area of Bibliometrics and how/if Open Science principles can change prevailing practice. The paper will then offer some tentative thoughts on the ability of European universities to embrace Open Science principles.

    Chapter XII: Denmark 28/2/2019
    10:45 - 11:25

    The Cultural Change of Open Science - the perspectives of a research intensive organisations and an associations of research intensive organisations (LERU)

    The LERU Roadmap for Open Science presents a model for how universities and research institutes can engage with the principles of Open Science. The paper will give an overview of the 8 pillars of Open Science which the Roadmap addresses, based on the definition of Open Science offered by the European Commission’s Open Science Policy Platform. The speaker will look at all 8 pillars, but concentrate on three of them, describing current work in each of these areas in UCL (University College London). For the Future of Scholarly Publishing, the speaker will look at the possible impact of Plan S on current models for scholarly publishing and also describes the new open journal publishing platform being launched by UCL Press in January 2019. The paper will also look at the readiness of universities to participate in the EOSC (European Open Science Cloud), being launched in Vienna on 23 November 2018. The third area the paper will look at is the challenging area of Bibliometrics and how/if Open Science principles can change prevailing practice. The paper will then offer some tentative thoughts on the ability of European universities to embrace Open Science principles.

    15:20 - 16:40

    Panel Discussion

    and Vice Chancellor Martin Zachariasen, IT University of Copenhagen. Chaired by David Budtz Pedersen, Aalborg University.

    Chapter XIII: Turin 7/5/2019
    09:20 - 10:00

    Keynote: EOSC and the Future of Research and Innovation in Europe

    As defined by the European Commission, Open Science consists of 8 pillars of understanding, amongst which are FAIR data and the European Open Science Cloud. Drawing on the results of the EC-funded LEARN project, this paper will look at the challenges which research data management brings to the research institution in an Open Science landscape where research data are at least as equally valued as publications. How, in Rewards systems, can FAIR and/or Open research data be valued as a route to reward and promotion? The paper will look at how these concepts have been embodied into the new UCL Academic Promotions Framework. In terms of skills development, what needs to happen to equip researchers (especially early career researchers) with the knowledge they need to work in a data-intensive environment? A recent European report has shown that, for the EU, the cost of not using FAIR data will be 10.2 bn euros a year. A second report promotes policy recommendations to make the FAIR data model sustainable. The paper will conclude by looking at the research infrastructure being put in place by UCL (University College London) to deliver on the research data agenda by studying in detail the launch of its new research data repository, which takes Open and FAIR data as the default.

    Chapter XIV: Rome 9/5/2019
    08:10 - 08:45

    Education as a Pillar of Open Science

    Education does not feature as one of the 8 pillars of Open Science, as defined by the European Commission, and this is a problem when considering the full range of activities which Open Science should embrace. There are also challenges in the UK in introducing the ‘Open’ concept to educational materials as these, unlike research outputs, do not fall under the Open Access requirements of the REF (Research Excellence Framework) or the TEF (Teaching Excellence Framework). UCL (University College London) has embraced the concept of research-based education and ‘Open’ approaches are helping to support this agenda. This paper will look at an initial UCL Scoping Study for Open Education (2016) and the current version of the UCL Open Education Roadmap (2017). The second part of the paper will look at the work of UCL Press, the UK’s first fully Open Access University Press, in delivering Open Educational outputs. It will start with the traditional textbook approach and then look at the development of the Press’s own textbook platform based on the BOOC (Books as Open Online Content). The paper will conclude by summarizing the challenges and benefits of Open Educational Resources as part of the Open Science agenda.

    02:15 - 03:15

    Panel Discussion

    Chapter XVI: London 23/5/2019
    10:00 - 10:20

    Opening Notes

    Chapter XVIII: Budapest 17/9/2019
    09:00 - 09:30

    Leading the Change to Open Science in European Universities

    This paper will take the LERU Roadmap for Open Science as a blueprint for introducing Open Science principles and practices into universities. UCL (University College London) is in the top 10 of global research-led universities. It is also the third oldest university in England. Using UCL as a case study, this paper will look at the 8 pillars of Open Science, as defined by the European Commission, and examine progress in introducing Open Science principles and practice at a university level. The paper will identify the benefits and challenges of the approach, and highlight what remains to be done. The paper will end by examining the LERU statement on the Leadership needed for Open Science to succeed.

    Chapter XIX: Gdansk 8/10/2019
    10:10 - 10:40

    Leading the Change to Open Science in European Universities

    This paper will take the LERU Roadmap for Open Science as a blueprint for introducing Open Science principles and practices into universities. UCL (University College London) is in the top 10 of global research-led universities. It is also the third oldest university in England. Using UCL as a case study, this paper will look at the 8 pillars of Open Science, as defined by the European Commission, and examine progress in introducing Open Science principles and practice at a university level. The paper will identify the benefits and challenges of the approach, and highlight what remains to be done. The paper will end by examining the LERU statement on the Leadership needed for Open Science to succeed.

    02:10 - 02:40

    Discussion Panel

    Chapter XXII: Ljubljana 8/11/2019
    10:30 - 10:50

    Education as a Pillar of Open Science

    Education does not feature as one of the 8 pillars of Open Science, as defined by the European Commission, and this is a problem when considering the full range of activities which Open Science should embrace. There are also challenges in the UK in introducing the ‘Open’ concept to educational materials as these, unlike research outputs, do not fall under the Open Access requirements of the REF (Research Excellence Framework) or the TEF (Teaching Excellence Framework). UCL (University College London) has embraced the concept of research-based education and ‘Open’ approaches are helping to support this agenda. This paper will look at an initial UCL Scoping Study for Open Education (2016) and the current version of the UCL Open Education Roadmap (2017). The second part of the paper will look at the work of UCL Press, the UK’s first fully Open Access University Press, in delivering Open Educational outputs. It will start with the traditional textbook approach and then look at the development of the Press’s own textbook platform based on the BOOC (Books as Open Online Content). The paper will conclude by summarizing the challenges and benefits of Open Educational Resources as part of the Open Science agenda.

    Chapter XXIII: Antalya 7/4/2020
    15:40 - 16:20

    Leading the Change to Open Science in European Universities

    This paper will take the LERU Roadmap for Open Science as a blueprint for introducing Open Science principles and practices into universities. UCL (University College London) is in the top 10 of global research-led universities. It is also the third oldest university in England. Using UCL as a case study, this paper will look at the 8 pillars of Open Science, as defined by the European Commission, and examine progress in introducing Open Science principles and practice at a university level. The paper will identify the benefits and challenges of the approach, and highlight what remains to be done. The paper will end by examining the LERU statement on the Leadership needed for Open Science to succeed.

    05:00 - 18:00

    Discussion Panel: Open Science in Turkey

    Chaired by Damla Bal, Scientific Knowledge Services

    Chapter XXXIX: Budapest 8/11/2022
    09:45 - 10:10

    Paul Ayris, Pro-Vice-Provost in University College London

    Recorded Presentation: UCL Press: A Model for the Future of Open Access Scholarly Publishing

    CHAPTER XXXVIII: PARIS 27/9/2022
    10:05 - 10:25

    Paul Ayris, Pro-Vice-Provost in UCL (University College London): From Rhetoric to Practice – The Role of the UCL Office for Open Science & Scholarship

    12:25 - 12:30

    Closing Notes by Paul Ayris, Pro-Vice-Provost in UCL (University College London)

    Chapter XXXVI: Latin America 1/6/2022
    15:10 - 15:30

    Paul Ayris, Pro-Vice-Provost in University College London

    Presentation: A Next Generation University Press: UCL Press as a model for Open Science publishing

    17:20 - 17:30

    Closing Notes by Paul Ayris, Pro-Vice-Provost in University College London

    Chapter XXXVII - Stockholm 2/6/2022
    15:20 - 15:30

    Closing Notes by Paul Ayris

    CHAPTER XXXIV: PARIS 16/12/2021
    14:05 - 14:25

    Paul Ayris, Pro-Vice-Provost (UCL Library Services & UCL Office for Open Science & Scholarship): Open Science – the role of the UCL Office for Open Science & Scholarship

    15:55 - 16:30

    Discussion Panel

    16:30 - 16:45

    Closing notes: Paul Ayris

    CHAPTER XXXIII: ROME 7/7/2021
    10:10 - 10:30

    Paul Ayris, Library Director UCL | 'Open Science – a blueprint for the university in the 21st century?'

    Title: Open Science – a blueprint for the university in the 21st century?

    Abstract: This paper looks at the role and importance of Open Science as identified by LERU (League of European Research Universities). It then shows how in UCL (University College London) those principles are put into practice via the UCL Office for Open Science and Scholarship. The paper looks at 2 areas of Open Science – the development of new publishing models in UCL Press, the UK’s first fully Open Access University Press; and the adoption of the principles of the San Francisco Declaration and the Leiden Manifesto in UCL’s academic Careers Framework. The paper concludes that Open Science does indeed represent a blueprint for the University of the 21st century, but that challenging choices have to be made.

    CHAPTER XXXII: STOCKHOLM 18/6/2021
    10:30 - 10:50

    Paul Ayris, Library Director UCL | 'Open Science – a blueprint for the university in the 21st century?'

    Title: Open Science – a blueprint for the university in the 21st century?
    Abstract: This paper looks at the role and importance of Open Science as identified by LERU (League of European Research Universities). It then shows how in UCL (University College London) those principles are put into practice via the UCL Office for Open Science and Scholarship. The paper looks at 2 areas of Open Science – the development of new publishing models in UCL Press, the UK’s first fully Open Access University Press; and the adoption of the principles of the San Francisco Declaration and the Leiden Manifesto in UCL’s academic Careers Framework. The paper concludes that Open Science does indeed represent a blueprint for the University of the 21st century, but that challenging choices have to be made.

    View Presentation

    Building Consistency for Open Science in Europe: Day 2 20/4/2021
    12:45 - 13:05

    Dr Paul Ayris (University College London) | 'Open Science – a blueprint for the university in the 21st century?'

    Abstract The paper looks at the 8 pillars of Open Science, as defined in Europe. It will use UCL (University College London) as a case study to illustrate the cultural change which is needed in an organization to support a move to Open Science. It will also identify the mechanisms being adopted by LERU (League of European Research Universities) to deliver that change. The paper will then look at 2 of the 8 pillars of Open Science as exemplars of change – the impact of the development of a bespoke publishing platform and the position taken by UCL in embedding DORA (San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment) into research assessment and career development frameworks.

    13:05 - 13:50

    Q&A Session

    Q&A Session with Dr Paul Ayris, Colleen Campbell, Dr Paolo Budroni.

    Moderated by Iryna Kuchma

    Chapter XVII: Madrid 8/7/2019
    09:15 - 09:45

    Dr. Paul Ayris, Pro-Vice-Provost University College London, UK: Leading the change to Open Science in European Universities

    Chair: Silvia Gómez Recio, YERUN

    Chapter XXIX: Vienna 20/11/2020
    10:50 - 11:10

    Open Science – a blueprint for the university in the 21st century?

    This paper will look at the 8 pillars of Open Science, as defined by the European Commission and described in the LERU (League of European Research Libraries) Open Science Roadmap, and which be analysed in the forthcoming LERU paper on Best Practice in adopting Open Science principles and policies. What are the strengths and challenges in each of the 8 pillars of Open Science and what is the range of responses that universities could make? In this landscape, the paper will then look at four of the 8 pillars, Open Access Publishing, Research Data Management and Open data E-Infrastructures (European Open Science Cloud), Promotions/Rewards and the responsible use of Bibliometrics, and Citizen Science. It will take UCL (University College London) as an exemplar of good practice and demonstrate with real life examples how this university has implemented new platforms and services, established new policies and practice, showing the benefits and the challenges of these approaches.

    11:50 - 13:00

    Discussion Panel: Open Science And Regulatory Frames

    Panelists: Karina Angelieva, Deputy Minister of Education and Science in Bulgaria Dr. Paul Ayris, University College London Prof. Li Jianhui, Chinese Academy of Science Martin Semberger, Austrian Federal Ministry for Digital and Economic Affairs Dr. Stefan Hanslik, Austrian Federal Ministry of Education, Science and Research Marie Timmermann, Science Europe Chair and Moderator: Dr. Paolo Budroni, TU Wien Co-chair: Dr. Tiberius Ignat, Scientific Knowledge Services

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