Tiberius Ignat

Tiberius Ignat

Scientific Knowledge Services

    Tiberius Ignat is the Director of Scientific Knowledge Services. He runs in partnership with UCL Press and LIBER Europe a series of workshops - Focus On Open Science. After being an individual member of LIBER, he became a LIBER Associate. Tiberius is a member of European Citizen Science Association and Citizen Science Association (US) and on the Scientific Committee for OAI11, the CERN - UNIGE Workshop on Innovations in Scholarly Communication.He has a PhD in Library and Information Science from the University of Bucharest.

    Chapter XX: Kaunas
    Presentation
    Citizen Science: Why should we Bother?

    All Sessions by Tiberius Ignat

    Chapter XLII: Budapest 11-14-2023
    14:40 - 15:05

    Harmonizing Citizen Science Initiatives: Implementation of the BESPOC Prototype Across Five Baltic Universities

    Abstract: As part of the LibOCS project, this presentation explores the ambitious implementation of the BESPOC model across five renowned Baltic universities: Tartu University, TallTech, Kaunas Technical University, Latvian University, and Vytautas Magnus University. This initiative is designed to foster collaborative and efficient single points of contact for citizen science endeavours within universities in the Baltic region. Central to this endeavour is a comprehensive programme that offers expert consultancy activities and enriching workshops, tailored to meet the needs of a diverse range of stakeholders, from libraries and researchers to associated community members. This integrated approach not only promises to streamline citizen science project management and public engagements at universities but it also has the potential to catalyse advancements in regional research collaborations.

    16:00 - 16:05

    Closing Remarks

    Chapter I: Vienna 11-20-2017
    10:10 - 10:50

    The Empires of the Future are The Empires of the Mind: Defining the Role of Libraries in Open Science Landscape

    Open Science represents a potential revolution in the way that research is undertaken, disseminated and curated. The paper will look at the main elements of the Open Science workflow – conceptualization, data gathering, analysis, publication, review – and the characteristics of that workflow – citizen science, open code, open access, preprints, alternative reputation systems, science blogs, open annotation, open data, open lab books/workflows, data-intensive approaches. Having established the baseline for Open Science approaches, the paper will look at the impact of open science in 4 areas of activity, identify the current role of the Library in each and the potential the Library has to contribute to this agenda going forward. The four areas which the paper will address are open access and new publishing models, research data management, the European Open Science cloud and citizen science. In the area of open access, libraries have customarily engaged in the payment of APCs (article processing charges) and in establishing open access repositories. The paper will look at activity in one of the most active UK open access teams at UCL and then examine future publishing models. In particular, it will show universities might themselves subvert the current monograph model by offering publishing services from university libraries. In research data management, the outputs and outcomes of the EU-funded LEARN project will be analysed. These will dwell on research data management policy, best practice case studies, executive briefings and the findings of a survey looking at the level of preparation for RDM in research organisations across the globe. The paper will look particularly at the future role for libraries in the research data space, which the LEARN project is identifying, and suggest that research data management in the context of open science re-defines the role of the Library in research support and the research workflow. The European open science cloud (EOSC) has the potential to put Europe at the forefront of open science developments. As a member of the high-level EOSC Expert Group, the principal speaker will analyse the main drivers behind the recommendations for the development of the cloud and the future role for libraries in sustaining this revolutionary development. Citizen science is part of citizen engagement in science and research. We observe a growing interest of citizens to contribute to a better society. In conjunction with newly-available technologies, a world of opportunities opens for research institutions. The paper will map existing experiences and recommendations from research intensive organizations and we will then present a blueprint for the roles of the library in this landscape with Guidelines for best practice. The paper will conclude by analysing the challenges which open science presents. Rooted in the research workflow, the paper will identify the impact which open science is having on libraries and identify future roles that they can adopt in their institutions, both to support and also to help lead open science implementation.

    16:40 - 17:20

    Joint Q & A Session

    Moderators: Dr. Tiberius Ignat and Paolo Budroni.

    Chapter II: Budapest 11-22-2017
    10:10 - 10:50

    The Empires of the Future are The Empires of the Mind: Defining the Role of Libraries in Open Science Landscape

    Open Science represents a potential revolution in the way that research is undertaken, disseminated and curated. The paper will look at the main elements of the Open Science workflow – conceptualization, data gathering, analysis, publication, review – and the characteristics of that workflow – citizen science, open code, open access, preprints, alternative reputation systems, science blogs, open annotation, open data, open lab books/workflows, data-intensive approaches. Having established the baseline for Open Science approaches, the paper will look at the impact of open science in 4 areas of activity, identify the current role of the Library in each and the potential the Library has to contribute to this agenda going forward. The four areas which the paper will address are open access and new publishing models, research data management, the European Open Science cloud and citizen science. In the area of open access, libraries have customarily engaged in the payment of APCs (article processing charges) and in establishing open access repositories. The paper will look at activity in one of the most active UK open access teams at UCL and then examine future publishing models. In particular, it will show universities might themselves subvert the current monograph model by offering publishing services from university libraries. In research data management, the outputs and outcomes of the EU-funded LEARN project will be analysed. These will dwell on research data management policy, best practice case studies, executive briefings and the findings of a survey looking at the level of preparation for RDM in research organisations across the globe. The paper will look particularly at the future role for libraries in the research data space, which the LEARN project is identifying, and suggest that research data management in the context of open science re-defines the role of the Library in research support and the research workflow. The European open science cloud (EOSC) has the potential to put Europe at the forefront of open science developments. As a member of the high-level EOSC Expert Group, the principal speaker will analyse the main drivers behind the recommendations for the development of the cloud and the future role for libraries in sustaining this revolutionary development. Citizen science is part of citizen engagement in science and research. We observe a growing interest of citizens to contribute to a better society. In conjunction with newly-available technologies, a world of opportunities opens for research institutions. The paper will map existing experiences and recommendations from research intensive organizations and we will then present a blueprint for the roles of the library in this landscape with Guidelines for best practice. The paper will conclude by analysing the challenges which open science presents. Rooted in the research workflow, the paper will identify the impact which open science is having on libraries and identify future roles that they can adopt in their institutions, both to support and also to help lead open science implementation.

    Chapter III: Ljubljana 11-24-2017
    09:10 - 09:50

    The Empires of the Future are The Empires of the Mind: Defining the Role of Libraries in Open Science Landscape

    Open Science represents a potential revolution in the way that research is undertaken, disseminated and curated. The paper will look at the main elements of the Open Science workflow – conceptualization, data gathering, analysis, publication, review – and the characteristics of that workflow – citizen science, open code, open access, preprints, alternative reputation systems, science blogs, open annotation, open data, open lab books/workflows, data-intensive approaches. Having established the baseline for Open Science approaches, the paper will look at the impact of open science in 4 areas of activity, identify the current role of the Library in each and the potential the Library has to contribute to this agenda going forward. The four areas which the paper will address are open access and new publishing models, research data management, the European Open Science cloud and citizen science. In the area of open access, libraries have customarily engaged in the payment of APCs (article processing charges) and in establishing open access repositories. The paper will look at activity in one of the most active UK open access teams at UCL and then examine future publishing models. In particular, it will show universities might themselves subvert the current monograph model by offering publishing services from university libraries. In research data management, the outputs and outcomes of the EU-funded LEARN project will be analysed. These will dwell on research data management policy, best practice case studies, executive briefings and the findings of a survey looking at the level of preparation for RDM in research organisations across the globe. The paper will look particularly at the future role for libraries in the research data space, which the LEARN project is identifying, and suggest that research data management in the context of open science re-defines the role of the Library in research support and the research workflow. The European open science cloud (EOSC) has the potential to put Europe at the forefront of open science developments. As a member of the high-level EOSC Expert Group, the principal speaker will analyse the main drivers behind the recommendations for the development of the cloud and the future role for libraries in sustaining this revolutionary development. Citizen science is part of citizen engagement in science and research. We observe a growing interest of citizens to contribute to a better society. In conjunction with newly-available technologies, a world of opportunities opens for research institutions. The paper will map existing experiences and recommendations from research intensive organizations and we will then present a blueprint for the roles of the library in this landscape with Guidelines for best practice. The paper will conclude by analysing the challenges which open science presents. Rooted in the research workflow, the paper will identify the impact which open science is having on libraries and identify future roles that they can adopt in their institutions, both to support and also to help lead open science implementation.

    Chapter IV: Rome 05-17-2018
    14:10 - 14:20

    The Role of Public-Private Partnership in Open Science

    This presentation will look at how public and private organisations can work together and contribute to the changing culture of doing science. Open Science means better use of collective intelligence and micro-expertise groups throughout the entire spectrum of our society. It is a new way of doing science in which every single one of us has a stake. To make it happen, the organisations need to start handling this change and to design new collaborations, based on principles like honesty, hard work, transparency and politeness. Private organisations should not look for customers. Instead, they should be looking for communities to which they can contribute and with which they can build fair services and products. Focus On Open Science series is a good example of such a partnership. In it’s fourth year, this series takes us to Rome (17.05), Barcelona (20.06), Ljubljana (11.09) Gdansk (25.09), Belgrade (12.11), Budapest (15.11), Vienna (16.11), Dublin (29.11).

    Chapter V: Barcelona 06-20-2018
    14:35 - 14:55

    The Role of Public-Private Partnership in Open Science

    This presentation will look at how public and private organisations can work together and contribute to the changing culture of doing science. Open Science means better use of collective intelligence and micro-expertise groups throughout the entire spectrum of our society. It is a new way of doing science in which every single one of us has a stake. To make it happen, the organisations need to start handling this change and to design new collaborations, based on principles like honesty, hard work, transparency and politeness. Private organisations should not look for customers. Instead, they should be looking for communities to which they can contribute and with which they can build fair services and products. Focus On Open Science series is a good example of such a partnership. In its fourth year, this series takes us to Rome (17.05), Barcelona (20.06), Ljubljana (11.09) Gdansk (25.09), Belgrade (12.11), Budapest (15.11), Vienna (16.11), Dublin (29.11).

    Chapter XI: Dublin 11-29-2018
    14:00 - 14:35

    Citizen Science and Research Libraries: the prospect of a long term relationship

    This presentation will highlight important new opportunities for libraries by analysing the roles they could potentially play in citizen science projects. Citizen science is one of the eight pillars of open science identified by the Open Science Policy Platform, a high-level EC Working Group. Several of these roles will be illustrated by recent case studies. This presentation thus will present a snapshot of what libraries have so far achieved in this sphere and the challenges and opportunities which remain.

    Chapter XII: Denmark 02-28-2019
    14:10 - 14:50

    Citizen Science and Research Libraries: the prospect of a long term relationship

    This presentation will highlight important new opportunities for libraries by analysing the roles they could potentially play in citizen science projects. Citizen science is one of the eight pillars of open science identified by the Open Science Policy Platform, a High Level Working Group of the European Commission. Several of these roles will be illustrated by recent case studies. This presentation thus will present a snapshot of what libraries have so far achieved in this sphere and the challenges and opportunities which remain.

    15:20 - 16:40

    Panel Discussion

    and Vice Chancellor Martin Zachariasen, IT University of Copenhagen. Chaired by David Budtz Pedersen, Aalborg University.

    Chapter XIII: Turin 05-07-2019
    10:30 - 10:50

    The Role of Public-Private Partnership in Open Science

    This presentation will discuss the role of Public-Private Partnership (PPP) in Open Science. The presenter will speak about how employing honesty, transparency, hard work and politeness in an environment of trust and understanding allow individual and organisations from all walks of life to take risks, express in confidence the intellectual curiosity, explore the bizarre and share lessons learned. Ignoring PPP opportunities is making Open Science less vibrant, disadvantaged and a reversible movement. Open Science in this view, means inclusiveness, interoperability and partnerships.

    Chapter XIV: Rome 05-09-2019
    09:05 - 09:30

    Citizen Science: Why Should We Bother?

    There are two major concerns for scientists: the Nature and the Society. All involved make fundamental and applied efforts to discover knowledge and to build meaning on it. Scholars search for sustainable progress; beings are rubbing shoulders on planet Earth. We all need data and collective intelligence that is orders of magnitude larger than what scientists could do alone. The underuse of citizen science is a missed opportunity for science and society. Take part in a cultural change and bring Science and Society together by developing research support services for citizen science.

    02:15 - 03:15

    Panel Discussion

    Chapter XV: Lovran 05-16-2019

    Focus on Open Science: Introduction

    This presentation shows the 5 years journey of our series of events. What is our mission statement, what are our aims and values and how a community could benefit from the organisation of a Focus on Open Science chapter?

    Chapter XVI: London 05-23-2019
    14:10 - 15:20

    Breakout Group 3: Designing Institutional Services for Enabling Citizen Science

    Room 604, 6th Floor, IOE Building

    Citizen Science is a fundamental element of at least three roadmaps that serve as inspiration for many European research libraries: the LIBER roadmap, the Open Science Policy Platform (OSPP) and the LERU Roadmap. It has a strong support from EC as the new framework program clearly recommends a stronger relationship between Science and Society. LIBER, LERU and OSPP all offer a series of recommendations about what could be done in this area. According to this, universities are presented with the opportunity to create new services and support their strategies, in many cases in collaboration with the library.

    Chapter XVIII: Budapest 09-17-2019
    09:10 - 09:40

    Citizen Science: Why Should We Bother?

    There are two major concerns for scientists: the Nature and the Society. All involved make fundamental and applied efforts to discover knowledge and to build meaning on it. Scholars search for sustainable progress; beings are rubbing shoulders on planet Earth. We all need data and collective intelligence that is orders of magnitude larger than what scientists could do alone. The underuse of citizen science is a missed opportunity for science and society. You are invited to take part in a cultural change and help both Science and Society to build a bridge that lasts, by developing research support services for citizen science.

    Chapter XIX: Gdansk 10-08-2019
    02:10 - 02:40

    Discussion Panel

    Chapter XXII: Ljubljana 11-08-2019
    15:00 - 15:50

    Round Table

    Chapter XXIII: Antalya 04-07-2020
    15:00 - 15:40

    Open Science - The Culture, The Movement, The Changes

    Long has been discussing the opportunity to transform the research endeavour into a more transparent enterprise. Yet, gaps remain between rhetoric and practice. The culture and the movement behind this transformation need further alignment and change management should complement the advocacy programmes. As we move toward this stage, there are some particular challenges that require anticipation on the front of internet trackers, algorithmic persuasion and Robotic Process Automation (RPA). The current digital content industry is heavily oriented towards building platforms that track users’ behaviour and seek to convince them to stay longer and come back sooner onto the platform. Similarly, authors are incentivised to publish more and to become champions of dissemination. Arguably, these incentive systems are built around public reputation supported by a system of metrics, hard to be assessed. Generally, the digital content industry is permeable to non-human contributors (algorithms that are able to generate content and reactions), anonymity and identity fraud. It is pertinent to discuss if early signs of track and persuasion are currently present in scholarly communication.

    05:00 - 18:00

    Discussion Panel: Open Science in Turkey

    Chaired by Damla Bal, Scientific Knowledge Services

    Chapter XXXIX: Budapest 11-08-2022
    09:35 - 09:40

    Introduction by Tiberius Ignat, Director at Scientific Knowledge Services

    15:40 - 15:45

    Closing Notes by Tiberius Ignat, Director at Scientific Knowledge Services

    Chapter XXXVI: Latin America 06-01-2022
    15:00 - 15:10

    Welcome Notes

    Welcome notes by Tiberius Ignat,
    Director of Scientific Knowledge Services

    Chapter XX: Kaunas 10-29-2019
    11:45 - 12:15

    Dr Tiberius Ignat, SKS: Citizen Science: Why should we Bother?

    Citizen Science: Why should we Bother?

    Chapter XXVIII: Ljubljana 11-10-2020
    11:20 - 11:45

    BESPOC - A Prototype for Citizen Science Single Point of Contact at Universities

    Citizen Science is one of the Open Science pillars as defined by the European Commission’s Open Science Policy Platform. It stays next to Responsible Research Indicators, FAIR Data, Open Access and 4 other important pillars designed to make research more open and reproducible. The purpose of this presentation is to create a conversation around our prototype for ‘Citizen Science Single Point of Contact’, a concept first introduced in October 2016 by the European League of Research Universities (LERU). Written as a recommendation for institutions, the Single Point of Contact for Citizen Science is suggested to the leadership of universities, to advise scientists and to ensure liaison with national and regional citizen science initiatives. Scientific Knowledge Services has been prototyping independently such a concept since 2017 when we first mentioned roles for European research libraries in the Citizen Science world. That happened at the LIBER Conference in PATRAS, Greece. Our prototype is called BESPOC (Broad Engagement in Science - Point of Contact) and it has nine elements. We will present in this contribution the core of each element.

    11:45 - 12:30

    Panel discussion

    Chaired by Miro Pušnik, University of Ljubljana

    Before you join the event, we would like to ask you:

    Would you like to receive a Certificate of Attendance?

    @KarelLuyben sets up our discussion: Fundamental research driven by curiosity is critical, linking to pragmatic and utility driven research and industry.
    Our basis for collaboration:
    – Respect
    – Trust
    – Friendship https://focusopenscience.org/book/20cesaer/ #OSBiz2020